Driveline Clunk

Discussion in 'Differential & Driveline' started by sphillips, May 1, 2014.

  1. sphillips

    sphillips New Member

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    I have a 2000 OBS Z71 Tahoe with 175000 miles.
    I've started getting on occasion a clunk when a accelerate from a full stop.
    U-joints maybe?

    Thx
     
  2. ncfd4303

    ncfd4303 Member

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    U-joints are know problems on these. I replaced mine on my Tahoe but it only need the rear one.
     
  3. silverado13

    silverado13 Moderator

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    my 2000 z71 does it ans so does my buddys 2000 z71, his has been doing it for like 80,000 miles and nothing has broken yet so i wasnt in to much of a hurry to fix it, it sounds like the u joint closest to the t case
     
  4. 3linkedchevy

    3linkedchevy Well-Known Member

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    My '99 Z71 does it as well. About ready to replace the u-joints on it myself. I also did some research and found that it could potentially be the oil pump case in the transfer case. I am going to start with the cheaper parts such as u joints before I dive into that repair.
     
  5. dirtyhick42

    dirtyhick42 Well-Known Member

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    My truck was doing the same thing back in July. Ended up being the rear u-joint
     
  6. silverado13

    silverado13 Moderator

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    when you do them, let me know if it fixes it
     
  7. 3linkedchevy

    3linkedchevy Well-Known Member

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    Will do... I need to go pick up the other ones. Will probably be a couple weeks though.
     
  8. silverado13

    silverado13 Moderator

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    i dread doing u joint, i always have some issue that takes a long time to deal with, i need to buy a shop press soon
     
  9. goldeneye94

    goldeneye94 New Member

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    I've seen a lot of issues with sticky slip yoke on the rear shaft as well. If you are replacing the u-joints, put a little black moly type grease in the splines. Doesn't take much.
     
  10. silverado13

    silverado13 Moderator

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  11. Nasty02Avalanche

    Nasty02Avalanche Member

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    If you have a truck with a million miles on it and you are too lazy to crawl under it to diagnose a problem, don't you think that it is time to take it to a garage and pay someone to diagnose it for you?

    There was a recall on the rear driveshaft on the 02 Avalanche I believe.
    There was a balance issue that caused a vibration.
    I can recall having mine replaced at the garage when it was relatively new.
    About 5 years later, I started to hear a clunk noise when I pulled out - just like you. Only the universals in the rear driveshaft were good.
    Some thought that it was the transfer case, I even changed the fluid in the transfer case after 80,000 miles - what a waste
    One day while doing a lube job, I noticed that the front driveshaft was turning slightly each time I moved the vehicle.
    This shouldn't be - since the front axle was not locked and the transfer case was working as designed.
    I came to find out that GM did this because there is an issue with the front drive shaft being so close to the exhaust that it burns the grease out of the universal. I bought two new Spicer U Joints and I paid my friend to torch them out and properly install them.. a key note - you don't press them in like some people thinks! If the loops are properly preheated, you can put U Joints in with your gloved fingers.

    Voila - the clunking noise went away!
     
  12. silverado13

    silverado13 Moderator

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    im not sure i like your demeanor buddy, i think your in the wrong place if you come here calling people lazy and telling them to bring their truck to a shop or dealer, this site is designed for DYI, not dicks
     
  13. nate3531

    nate3531 Well-Known Member

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    I agree, every post I have seen of his has been demeaning and insulting to the OP.
     
  14. silverado13

    silverado13 Moderator

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    aint no buddy got time fo dat
     
  15. Nasty02Avalanche

    Nasty02Avalanche Member

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    I wouldn't trust you to fix my bicycle.
     
  16. Nasty02Avalanche

    Nasty02Avalanche Member

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    At one time, a shade tree mechanic, with a proper set of tools could take apart a car and put it back together again with nothing more then a Motor Auto Repair Manual to guide them and advise them to the clearances and tolerances and the proper procedure to disassemble and reassemble the components.

    Today we deal with computers. Body Control Modules, Powertrain control Modules, etc. Within that computer is a program. At one time it was acceptable to have one bad line of code per every 10 lines of code.
    As long as the vehicle ran the dealer could reflash the computer when there was an issue and programmers constantly worked to rewrite the code - even after the vehicle was built and sold.

    Today, unless you have access to the updated programs and a Tech II to reflash the computer, diagnose the computer and do simple maintenance such as a pulse of the ABS to pump up the brakes - you can't do a proper job of repairing your vehicle and all you end up doing is throwing parts at it with the hopes that the light will go out and the problem will go away.

    Some things are not hard to figure out if you have the proper skills and training and the proper tools to work on it.
    The transfer case for instance uses the same clutches and steels as a TH 400 - which has been around since the 1960's.
    The transmission has similarities to the 700R4 - which was basically a TH 400 with overdrive - just electronic shift and computer controlled.

    The engines has both internal and external problems.
    Sensors that were never properly designed or installed, materials used in the block, pistons and heads that were marginal at best when new.
    Brakes and rear ends and wheel bearings that were never designed for lift kits, larger tires or even the tires that the vehicle came with.

    Simple little things like window regulators that fails usually after 60,000 miles and electronic locks on the door handles that sometimes doesn't even make it that long.

    Yes there are some things that you can replace yourself and save a couple of dollars, but you also have to know about issues associated with those parts such as problems with the calipers, brake lines, brake pad sliders, pins, and that is just one issue with the brakes.

    Once those vehicles gets so many miles on them, they just seem to disintegrate. I can't say much else that is any better about the Fords or the Dodge's.

    I manage a fleet of GM vehicles, I deal with these problems on a daily basis.
    I have a guy at the GM garage that I trust, that is the only person that I trust with my repairs. If I can't fix it I send it to him.
    Usually I just walk in the door, I tell them what the problem is and what it needs to be repaired. They either approve the repair, or they diagnose the problem themselves and then they basically do what I told them to do in the first place.

    I worked for a year at a major junkyard.
    I disassembled all makes and models of vehicles.
    I saw everything that went wrong with those vehicles when they were new and I knew how to take them apart and put them back together again.
    All I did was give some advice - how to fix a known problem.
    And if I tell you that it is not as simple as just forcing the old part out and forcing the new part in - it is not because I am trying to be mean, but because I have had experience just trying to do it without the proper tools and equipment and have experienced failures or problems because the vehicle was not repaired properly.

    If GM would have stopped making new trucks when they came out with the 1979 Silverado, we wouldn't have all these problems we have today.
    Probably the best trucks GM ever made were between 1974 and 1979....
    The newer trucks were nothing but garbage, too much plastic and not enough steel...
     
  17. silverado13

    silverado13 Moderator

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    completely fine buddy, the amount of money ive saved by fixing my own vehicles is worth it to me
     
  18. 2003tahoe

    2003tahoe Well-Known Member

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    true dat, took apart most of my truck just to see how everything fit together and to fix alot of stuff no phone or book to help me, during summer when school was out and when i had no job
     
  19. silverado13

    silverado13 Moderator

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    Thats the whole point of a forum
     
  20. 19trax95

    19trax95 Well-Known Member

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    I have no input for the clunk, but I will say that forums in general are a excellent resource. I know I have used the help of other many times before. From simple things I was overlooking to stuff that I didn't even know was possible.